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2 weken geleden

Ottolina

Training a horse is not the same as riding a horse.

Training, it sounds so simple but it is everything but simple. It all boils down to changing what is … in the here and now aiming for “better”.

Owners can be very firm in their statement about the nature and character of their horse. He is always “….”. In doing so they often confuse behaviour with what they call ‘nature and character’.

Using an example I will try to explain what I mean. When I come to teach and they describe their very laidback sometime lazy horse. How hard to ride and how much energy they must put in to get him going. Often combined with not stopping easily when he goes. He might not do what is asked and have “a mind of its own”. And has been like this for years.

Most of the time I start assessing the horse itself. Does he look fit, does he feel fit or do I find tension. How does he move, is he balanced, is he flexible. Because often the horse is not “laidback and lazy” but just restricted in his movement and not able to do what is asked of him. When I get to know the horse and rider better I can help them find what is needed to get a healthier and happier horse. Having the horse physically checked and treated might sometime be necessary.

Teaching owners and riders to better understand their horse is what I like the most. Teach them to feel and see what their horse needs and what they can do themselves to improve his health. Doing groundwork, “in hand work”, lunging and riding whatever works best for them. All to help the horse with coordination, loosen him up and strengthen him. During the riding lessons we will focus on balance, relaxation and strengthening. Here I often need to start with the riders body awareness, balance and coordination.

All this together is what makes riding a horse into training a horse. The result might be that the horse becomes “lighter” to ride and shows to be quite forward, easy to stop and turn, in general he might really like to do what is asked of him. Actually what had been seen as ‘nature and character’ was nothing more than behaviour. Behaviour developed from being not physically fit and healthy.

Helping the horse thru training to become “better”.
... MeerMinder

Training a horse is not the same as riding a horse.

Training, it sounds so simple but it is everything but simple. It all boils down to changing what is … in the here and now aiming for “better”. 

Owners can be very firm in their statement about the nature and character of their horse. He is always “….”. In doing so they often confuse behaviour with what they call ‘nature and character’.

Using an example I will try to explain what I mean. When I come to teach and they describe their very laidback sometime lazy horse. How hard to ride and how much energy they must put in to get him going. Often combined with not stopping easily when he goes. He might not do what is asked and have “a mind of its own”. And has been like this for years.

Most of the time I start assessing the horse itself. Does he look fit, does he feel fit or do I find tension. How does he move, is he balanced, is he flexible. Because often the horse is not “laidback and lazy” but just restricted in his movement and not able to do what is asked of him. When I get to know the horse and rider better I can help them find what is needed to get a healthier and happier horse. Having the horse physically checked and treated might sometime be necessary.

Teaching owners and riders to better understand their horse is what I like the most. Teach them to feel and see what their horse needs and what they can do themselves to improve his health. Doing groundwork, “in hand work”, lunging and riding whatever works best for them. All to help the horse with coordination, loosen him up and strengthen him. During the riding lessons we will focus on balance, relaxation and strengthening. Here I often need to start with the riders body awareness, balance and coordination.

All this together is what makes riding a horse into training a horse. The result might be that the horse becomes “lighter” to ride and shows to be quite forward, easy to stop and turn, in general he might really like to do what is asked of him. Actually what had been seen as ‘nature and character’ was nothing more than behaviour. Behaviour developed from being not physically fit and healthy.

Helping the horse thru training to become “better”.
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